YESCO turns 100, represents one of the world’s largest maker of iconic signs

YESCO, a renowned company known for creating internationally recognizable signs, celebrates 100 years in business in 2020. Today, YESCO represents one of North America’s largest and most-recognized sign companies thanks to its historic roster of iconic signs.

The family-owned and operated company began in 1920 in Ogden, Utah when founder Thomas Young borrowed $300 from his father to start the business. It began specializing in wall-painted advertisements, gold-leaf window lettering and coffin plates.

Today, headquartered in Salt Lake City and helmed by second-, third- and fourth-generation members of the Young family, YESCO designs and creates the world’s most spectacular signs, incorporating dazzling color, LED displays, motion and digital animation and video. With three state-of-the-art manufacturing plants featuring automated and custom equipment, as well as sales and service offices located around the country the company continues to grow. YESCO also operates a franchise sign-and-lighting service business throughout the United States and Canada. “This year marks an extraordinary milestone for our family’s business,” says Jeff Young, vice president and chief marketing officer, YESCO. “Thanks to my grandfather’s vision and ingenuity during the pioneering days of sign design, along with the hard work of nearly 1,100 employees today, our company is – literally – looking ahead to a bright future.

A pivotal moment in the history of YESCO was its entry into the burgeoning Las Vegas market in 1932, with the iconic Boulder Club sign, which depicted a stein of flowing beer. With this sign and others, YESCO became a pioneer in incorporating neon into storefront advertising and acquired national recognition for its creativity. In 1945, the company opened a branch in Las Vegas, which today represents its largest.

Recognizable examples of YESCO’s work illuminate the United States and Canada. Notable projects include:

  • Hacienda Horse and Rider, Silver Slipper, Vegas Vic and Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas sign, Las Vegas
  • El Capitan Theatre, Hollywood, California
  • The Forum, Inglewood, California
  • Snelgrove Ice Cream, featuring a giant, rotating ice cream cone, Salt Lake City
  • Iconic Olympic rings illuminating the 2002 Olympic Winter Games, Salt Lake City
  • Denver International Airport, Denver
  • Million Dollar Cowboy Bar, Jackson Hole, Wyoming
  • Jackson’s Food Stores, Boise, Idaho
  • Vee Quiva Hotel & Casino Laveen, Arizona
  • Reno Arch, Reno, Nevada
  • Rogers Arena, Edmonton, Alberta
  • Signage for Las Vegas Raiders Allegiant Stadium, Las Vegas, opening in 2020.

100 years of creating Las Vegas’ most iconic signs

Charlie Rundquist remembers how, as a young child, his father would put him in the backseat of his Kaiser and cruise down the Strip or Fremont Street to look at the neon lights and glittering signs of the city’s skyline.

His father would stare at the lights, too. Not in youthful admiration, but to scrutinize signs where a bulb had burst or a light was out or the neon had tarnished.

The weekly field trips for Rundquist were sign patrol assignments for his father, who worked for Yesco, then called the Young Electric Sign Company.

The company is responsible for most of the neon and LED signs in Las Vegas, including Vegas Vic, the Silver Slipper, several panoramic video screens on Las Vegas Boulevard and the newly installed letters on Allegiant Stadium. On Friday, the company will celebrate its 100th anniversary...

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YESCO Installs First Signage at Allegiant Stadium

As Allegiant Stadium’s exterior has come into form, the dark tinted glass has drawn various nicknames. Now, however, the stadium will begin to reflect its official name.

The first stadium signage for Allegiant Stadium was beginning to be installed Thursday morning, with the lowercase “a” from Allegiant being affixed to the east facing portion of the $2 billion stadium. Once the sign is installed, it will be tough for anyone passing by the stadium on Interstate 15 to miss the Allegiant name.

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